Good aspects of online dating sites

In fact, that aforementioned 2012 review found that online daters were less willing to settle down and commit to a single partner while they had boundless options literally at their fingertips, a sentiment that 32 percent of Internet users echoed in a 2013 Pew Research Center poll.

A potential limitation, according to a 2012 critical analysis paper, is that sites don't have any way of knowing how people will act once they've met a match, since the intake questionnaires only gather information about singles they're matched.

In the end, if you’re looking for a good match, they’re usually worth the investment.

If you’re about to head into the world of online dating, you’ll want to know what you’re in for.

Eight months after going through a divorce and becoming a single father, I recently decided to get back into the dating game.

My free time, however, is at a premium, considering that I work a full-time day job and run two side businesses from home.

The share of 18- to 24-year-olds who use online dating has roughly tripled from 10% in 2013 to 27% today.

Internet dating, social dating, Facebook dating, or the old-fashioned way of meeting offline at work or with a little help from your friends or grandmother.

There are so many more options available to singles dating in the digital age, yet so many can't seem to connect. As an online dating expert and coach, one of the top questions I'm frequently asked is, which method is better?

A 2012 comprehensive review of online dating sites found that having access to a seemingly infinite supply of profiles "can lead individuals to commoditize potential partners." In that situation, it's pretty easy for people to become overly picky -- women can sometimes be deemed undesirable with Three words: paradox of choice.

Having an unlimited pool of potential dates can not only make people feel less satisfied with their ultimate decision, but it can also lead them to freeze up and not make a choice at all.